Hallicrafters S-19R Sky Buddy

 Looking around my collection I spotted this old Hallicrafters radio. I can't remember where it came from but it's been home to a family of mice judging by the shells of nuts inside the chassis. I think this set was made around 1938 and is a strictly budget model having the general look of the more expensive Sky Champion. It differs from that by having no RF stage and a much simpler coil pack. The outer case doesn't have a hinged top, I guess in an effort to keep the price low.

 

 

 There are six valves and it has, surprisingly an AC power supply suitable for use in the UK. The mains transformer looks peculiar because of the odd dimensions of its laminations. Maybe it's US designer overkill for 50Hz mains because often a 60Hz transformer designed for US use will be very noisy at 50Hz. The chassis and outer case look a bit rusty and aluminium parts are corroded but, overall, it's in fair condition and eminently restorable. Note the mains-energised loudspeaker... and no superfluous components. The valves are as follows... Mixer/RF 6K8, IF amplifier 6SK7, detector/AVC/audio amplifier 6SQ7GT, audio output 41, BFO 76 and HT rectifier 80.

 

 

 There are two tuning knobs. Main tuning turns the metal dial, above, and fine tuning operates the vanes on the modified main tuning condenser (as shown below) with the setting given on the central dial, disguised as a meter. Sky Champion tuning works in a completely different way using extra gearwheels coupled to the main tuning. This example is an "R" version which has an extra waveband (the basic model isn't fitted with the highest frequency band).

From the dial above you'll see this model covers 540-1700 Kc/s; 1.7 - 5.5 Mc/s; 5.5 - 17 Mc/s and 16 - 45 Mc/s. The IF is 455 Kc/s.

 
 
   

 

 

 The light corrosion on the front panel can be easily treated and once I've replaced all the rusty screws it's looks will be acceptable.

Click the circuit diagram to see a larger picture.
 

 And a 1939 advertisement for the S19 which slightly predated the "R" version. It has a couple of different valves and no BFO. Note the typo in the bullet points concerning its frequency coverage.
 

 
 Finally, at least before restoring this set any further, I removed and cleaned the valves and cleaned up the chassis. Unlike other US sets this model has a mains transformer compatible with UK mains and, with its simple under-chassis layout, it will be easy to work on.

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